This blog post will change your life…

Hello all, I have blogged at last! (For those of you who were surprised to get the notification from WordPress!) It is now the flip side of my twenty week internship at the Olmsted Center, which ended last Friday. First, I would really like to put forward an enormous Thank You to everyone at the Olmsted Center both at State Street and the Charlestown Navy Yard, Giles Parker and Marc Albert and the crew on the Fourth Floor at the Boston Harbor Islands, and my co-DTP interns Sasha, Shanasia, Kristi and Ashley. I am overwhelmed with the amount of knowledge I have gained, and appreciation I have for everyone there. It feels safe to say, there are not many post-grads who enter into the workplace to find a group so diversely dedicated to the same mission in Landscape Management and Preservation, and beyond!

I always tried to keep it as tidy as Chris's. It never seemed to get there...

I always tried to keep it as tidy as Chris’s. It never seemed to get there…

The past twenty weeks have been quite quick to fly by (perhaps being in graduate school the past three years helps this cause, not sure?). The last few weeks were spent writing and formatting the (hopefully) close-to-being-done CLR Volume II: Existing Conditions for the Boston Harbor Islands (I’ll admit, there are few bits I did not get to…but, hey 34 Islands and Peninsulas were mapped!) I also spent some time preparing a presentation on my work, and gathering information for a Landscape Architecture studio that will be based on the Boston Harbor Islands. I think it was important to take a step back on the work we all had done as interns, and I found a lot of ideas and concepts that rose to the surface, which will be of great use to me as I venture forward in Landscape Preservation.

View of Little Brewster Island from the top of Boston Light

View of Little Brewster Island from the top of Boston Light, Boston skyline in distance.

Boston Light

View of Boston Light on Little Brewster Island from the south.

So, going forward: Twenty weeks is a relatively short time to be able to scratch the surface on what you need to understand in the world of Landscape Architecture and stewardship in the National Parks, so maybe you need a little bit more practice, you know say, IN ACADIA NATIONAL PARK?!! Yeah, you guessed it,  I will be returning to work on a project with the park that takes a closer look at the inventory and analysis of an important landscape in the story of Acadia, and its Founding Father, George B. Dorr. I won’t give away too much, but it includes the following: views of the ocean, a “cottage” foundation, and a mid-late 19th century residential coastal landscape!

Granite steps at Old Farm, the Dorr Family Estate, Acadia National Park.

Granite steps at Old Farm, the Dorr Family Estate, Acadia National Park.

See, I told you this blog post may change your life! But, if it didn’t, stay tuned, as I plan to blog thoughout my project with Acadia National Park!

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